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  • Jun 11, 2014

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    The MAN B&W Duel Fuel Engines – Starting a New Era in Shipping
    The need for seaborne transportation will increase significantly in the years to come. At the same time, the heavy fuel oil (HFO) price is increasing, stricter emission requirements are coming into force and the public is becoming more concerned about the environmental footprint of shipping. As a result, the industry is investigating in alternative fuels for shipping. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is an attractive option and is expected to be cheaper than fuel oil in the future.
    PDF, 793.24 KB
  • Sep 05, 2014

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    Using Methanol Fuel in the MAN B&W ME-LGI Series
    Methanol as a ship fuel is interesting for ship operators because it does not contain sulphur and is liquid in ambient air conditions which makes it easy to store on board ships. So for ships operating in International Maritime Organization (IMO) emission control areas (ECA), methanol could be a feasible solution to meet sulphur requirements.
    PDF, 454.71 KB
  • Aug 15, 2013

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    Service Experience Two Stroke Engines
    This paper describes in detail the service experience of the new generation of super-long stroke S and G Mk 9 type engines. Focus will be on the cylinder condition in general and cold corrosion control in particular. The service experience with new jacket cooling water systems, new cylinder oils (BN 100 types), modified combustion chamber design and new versions of the Alpha Lubricators (main focus: Alpha Mk II) will be outlined.
    PDF, 3.29 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Waste Heat Recovery System
    The increasing interest in emission reduction, ship operating costs reduction and the newly adapted IMO EEDI rules calls for measures that ensure optimal utilisation of the fuel used for main engines on board ships. Main engine exhaust gas energy is by far the most attractive among the waste heat sources of a ship because of the heat flow and temperature. It is possible to generate an electrical output of up to 11% of the main engine power by utilising this exhaust gas energy in a waste heat recovery system comprising both steam and power turbines, and combined with utilising scavenge air energy for exhaust boiler feed-water heating.
    PDF, 2.02 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    ME-GI Dual Fuel MAN B&W Engines
    This paper describes the latest developments in ME-GI dual fuel MAN B&W two-stroke engines and associated fuel supply systems. The discussion and interest in lowering CO2, NOx, SOx and particulate emissions have increased operators’ and shipowners’ interest in investigating future fuel alternatives.
    PDF, 1.50 MB
  • Apr 22, 2014

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    G60ME-C9 Vibration Performance
    MAN Diesel & Turbo has successfully completed structural vibration measurements on the first Green Dolphin 64,000 dwt bulk carrier propelled by the new »green« G-type ultra-long stroke 5G60ME-C9 main engine.
    PDF, 536.42 KB
  • Oct 02, 2013

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    Propulsion of 2,200-2,800 teu Container Vessel
    The main ship particulars of 2,200-2,800 teu container vessels are normally approximately as follows: the overall ship length is 210 m, breadth 30 m and scantling draught 11.4-12.0 m. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for larger feeder container vessels as outlined in the following. One of the goals in the marine industry today is to reduce the impact of CO2 emissions from ships and, therefore, to reduce the fuel consumption for the propulsion of ships to the widest possible extent at any load.
    PDF, 1.01 MB
  • Mar 03, 2014

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    Propulsion of 200,000-210,000 dwt Large Capesize Bulk Carrier
    The main ship particulars of 205,000-210,000 dwt large capesize bulk carriers are normally approximately as follows: the overall ship length is 299.9 m, breadth 50 m and scantling draught 17.9-18.4 m. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for large capesize bulk carriers as outlined in the following. One of the goals in the marine industry today is to reduce the impact of CO2 emissions from ships and, therefore, to reduce the fuel consumption for the propulsion of ships to the widest possible extent at any load.
    PDF, 958.56 KB
  • May 20, 2013

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    Propulsion of 7,000-10,000 dwt Small Tanker
    The main ship particulars of 7,000-10,000 dwt small tankers are normally approximately as follows: the overall ship length is 116 m, breadth 18 m and scantling draught 7.0-8.0 m. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for small tankers (and bulk carriers) as outlined in this paper
    PDF, 947.51 KB
  • Nov 20, 2012

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    Propulsion of 30,000 dwt Handysize Bulk Carrier
    The main ship particulars of 30,000 dwt Handysize bulk carriers are normally approximately as follows: the overall ship length is 178 m, breadth 28 m and design/scantling draught 9.5 m/10.0 m, see Fig. 1. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for Handysize bulk carriers (and tankers) as outlined in this paper
    PDF, 1022.12 KB
  • Dec 20, 2012

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    Propulsion of 46,000-50,000 dwt Handymax Tanker
    The main ship particulars of 46,000-50,000 dwt Handymax tankers are normally as follows: the overall ship length is 183 m, breadth 32.2 m and design/scantling draught 11.0 m/12.2 m. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for Handymax tankers (and bulk carriers) as outlined in this paper. One of the goals in the marine industry today is to reduce the impact of CO2 emissions from ships and, therefore, to reduce the fuel consumption for the propulsion of ships to the widest possible extent at any load.
    PDF, 1.03 MB
  • Nov 20, 2012

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    Ice Classed Ships Main Engines
    Many merchant ship types are built for a given ice class notation which depends on the classification society and on the ice form and thickness during winter operation. Building a ship for an ice class for winterisation means for example that the hull has to be thicker with stronger girders, beams and bulkheads which, of course again, depend on the degree of ice class.
    PDF, 2.00 MB
  • Sep 17, 2013

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    Basic Principles of Ship Propulsion
    For the purpose of this paper, the term “ship” is used to denote a vehicle employed to transport goods and persons from one point to another over water. Ship propulsion normally occurs with the help of a propeller, which is the term most widely used in English, although the word “screw” is sometimes seen, inter alia in combinations such as a “twin-screw” propulsion plant.
    PDF, 1.23 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Engine Management - Concept for LNG Carriers
    The world has enormous quantities of natural gas, but much of it is located in areas far from where the gas is needed. To move this environmentally friendly fuel across great distances, across oceans, natural gas must be converted into liquefied natural gas (LNG). Shipping is a vital component in any LNG supply train. But an LNG project’s shipping could simply be considered as a floating pipeline for the transportation of LNG, therefore LNG shipping is normally considered in the long term.
    PDF, 953.55 KB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Costs and Benefits of LNG
    The use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as ship fuel has recently gained more attention in Europe, but also in Asia and the USA. There are three visible drivers which, taken together, make LNG as ship fuel one of the most promising new technologies for shipping.
    PDF, 1.40 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Service Experience Small Bore Four-Stroke Engines
    For the small bore four-stroke engines, considerable know-how is available in Denmark within the four-stroke organisation at Holeby. The MAN Diesel & Turbo Holeby organisation is the day-to-day cooperation partner when it comes to component sales, technical support, GenSet and engine design, etc.
    PDF, 1.30 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Tier III Two-stroke Technology
    This MAN Diesel & Turbo two-stroke Tier III paper outlines the status and future development efforts in connection with Tier III technologies, and covers some of our efforts to develop measuring and calculation tools, securing better knowledge of engine processes like combustion, emission formation and scavenging of the engine.
    PDF, 1.76 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    QUANTUM 9000
    The need for seaborne transportation will increase significantly in the years to come. At the same time, the fuel oil price is increasing, stricter emission requirements are coming into force, and the public is becoming more concerned about the environmental footprint of shipping.
    PDF, 2.40 MB
  • Feb 09, 2012

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    Blended Edge Main Bearings
    The blended edge (BE) design was introduced on thin shell white metal main bearings to better cope with crankshaft inclinations and thereby increase the resistance towards edge fatigue failures. The blended edge design is the corresponding item to the thick shell flex-edge design for MC engines.
    PDF, 1.48 MB
  • Oct 06, 2014

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    Soot Deposits and Fires in Exhaust Gas Boilers
    The demand for the highest possible overall fuel efficiency is reflected in developments in the propulsion market for oceangoing ships. Today, this market is dominated by highly efficient two?stroke low speed diesel engines which run on low quality fuels and utilise (recover) the exhaust gas heat by means of an exhaust gas boiler/economiser.
    PDF, 1.36 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Propulsion of VLCC
    The size of Very Large Crude Carriers, VLCCs, is normally within the deadweight range of 250,000-320,000 dwt and the ship’s overall length is about 330-335 m. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for VLCCs as outlined in this paper.
    PDF, 998.52 KB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    Propulsion of 8,000-10,000 teu Container Vessel
    The maximum size of recent 8,000-10,000 teu container vessels, is normally at the scantling draught within the deadweight range of 95,000-120,000 dwt and the ship’s overall length is about 320-350 m and with a breadth of about 43-46 m. Recent development steps have made it possible to offer solutions which will enable significantly lower transportation costs for container ships as outlined in this paper.
    PDF, 874.79 KB
  • Jun 18, 2014

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    G-Type Engine Revolutionary Ultra-Long-Stroke
    The first G-type engine, designated G80ME-C, has a design that follows the principles of the large bore Mk 9 engine series that MAN Diesel & Turbo introduced in 2006. The G-type is designed with a longer stroke to reduce engine speed, thereby paving the way for ship designs with unprecedented high efficiency.
    PDF, 484.29 KB
  • Jun 16, 2014

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    MAN Alpha CP Propeller – Product Information
    The brochure gives a description of the basic design principles of the Alpha Controllable Pitch (CP) propeller equipment. It contains dimensional sketches, thereby making it possible to work out shaft line and engine room arrangement drawings.
    PDF, 2.03 MB
  • Aug 25, 2010

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    Influence of Ambient Temperature Conditions
    Diesel engines used as prime movers on ships are exposed to the varying climatic temperature conditions that prevail in different parts of the world, and must therefore be able to operate under all ambient conditions from winter to summer and from arctic to tropical areas
    PDF, 1.30 MB
  • Aug 25, 2010

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    Operation on Low-Sulphur Fuels
    The average sulphur content of heavy fuel oil (HFO) used for marine diesel engines is 2.7% today. This will undoubtedly change with the coming emission legislation, which will lower the emission limits of SOx, NOx, particulate, HC, CO and CO2. See also list of abbreviations.
    PDF, 1.30 MB
  • Aug 25, 2010

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    How to Influence CO2
    The purpose of this paper is to turn focus on CO2 emissions from marine engine operation. The paper describes the attention from the world society, the regulation expected from international organisations and how we can influence CO2 emission by means of engine optimisation, waste heat recovery and alternative fuels.
    PDF, 1.63 MB
  • Sep 01, 2012

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    SFOC Optmisation Methods
    One of the goals in the marine industry today is to reduce the impact of CO2 emissions from ships and thereby to reduce the fuel consumption for the propulsion of ships to the widest possible estimate at any load.
    PDF, 734.73 KB
  • Mar 25, 2014

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    Propulsion Trends in Bulk Carriers
    Bulk carriers, container vessels and tankers are the three largest groups of vessels within the merchant fleet and, therefore, this market segment deserves great attention. The purpose of this paper – dealing with bulk carrier sizes above 5,000 dwt, and based on an analysis of bulk carriers built/ordered over the last eight years – is to illustrate the latest ship particulars used for modern bulk carriers, and determine their impact on the propulsion power demand and main engine choice, using the latest MAN B&W two-stroke engine programme as the basis.
    PDF, 1.60 MB
  • Oct 04, 2007

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    MAN B&W Low Speed Small Bore Engines
    With the new S50ME&B, which will be designated Mk 9, we have introduced a competitive engine designed for new modern hull designs, based on more efficient propellers with a lower optimum propeller speed. The engine will adopt the design features introduced on the smaller ME&B engines, and will be introduced with a mep of 21 bar at 117 rpm.
    PDF, 1.22 MB
  • Jul 19, 2005

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    Thermo Efficiency System
    Following the trend of required higher overall ship efficiency since the first oil crisis in 1973, the efficiency of the main engines has increased and, today, the fuel energy efficiency is about 50% This high efficiency has, among others,led to a correspondingly lower exhaust gas temperature after the turbochargers.
    PDF, 817.81 KB
  • Jul 15, 2009

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    Ambient Temperature Operation and Matching
    This paper will outline operation possibilities with a standard matched engine in any extreme temperature environment and describe the possibilities for special matching of engines for more permanent operation under such conditions.
    PDF, 334.07 KB
  • Oct 04, 2007

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    MAN B&W Low Speed Large Bore Engines
    With the new S50ME&B, which will be designated Mk 9, we have introduced a competitive engine designed for new modern hull designs, based on more efficient propellers with a lower optimum propeller speed. The engine will adopt the design features introduced on the smaller ME&B engines, and will be introduced with a mep of 21 bar at 117 rpm.
    PDF, 659.50 KB
  • Sep 12, 2014

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    Improved Efficiency and Reduced CO2
    One of the future goals in the marine industry is to reduce the impact of CO2 emissions from ships in order to meet the coming stricter International Maritime Organisation (IMO) greenhouse gas emission requirements.
    PDF, 378.72 KB
  • Aug 19, 2008

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    Propulsion Trends in Container Vessels
    The use of containers started during the Second World War, and the first ship specifically designed for container transportation appeared in 1960, viz. the Supanya, of 610 teu. Particularly, the amount of cargo shipped in containers has increased considerably over the last fifteen years, resulting in a rapid increase in both the number and the size of container vessels during this period.
    PDF, 1.81 MB
  • Jan 18, 2012

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    Reducing Engine Room Overhauling Height
    In the late 1970s, MAN Diesel & Turbo in Copenhagen conducted an investigation into the building-in heights of engine room cranes, and found that, at that time, all engine room cranes on the market required far too much headroom. We therefore decided to develop a particularly low-headroom crane, for which we were granted patents in many countries. The further development of this crane led to the ‘MAN B&W double-jib crane’.
    PDF, 886.02 KB
  • Aug 19, 2008

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    Exhaust Gas Emission Control Today and Tomorrow
    MAN Diesel & Turbo designs and develops two-stroke engines that comply with the demands and regulations made to the maritime industry, and cooperates with authorities, governments and international organisations on the development of new regulations to fulfil the goal of reducing exhaust gas emissions by realistic methods.The aim is to arrive at methods that are applicable and practical to ship operators, and which will maintain a high level of safety and reliability of the engines.
    PDF, 1.65 MB
  • Feb 19, 2009

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    Guidelines for Fuels and Lubes Purchasing
    MAN Diesel & Turbo’s engines are designed to operate in accordance with the unifuel principle. This paper gives guidelines for such issues as fuels and lubes purchasing, operation on low-sulphur fuel, and lube oil blending on board.
    PDF, 483.03 KB
  • Jan 18, 2012

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    Low Container Ship Speed Facilitated by Versatile ME/ME-C Engines
    Recently, fuel oil prices have risen to unprecedented levels, bringing fuel oil consumption of diesel engines more into focus than for a long time. At the same time, exhaust gas emissions in general and CO2 emission in particular are top priorities. One way of reducing fuel consumption as well as CO2 emission is to reduce the ship speed. Fig. 1 shows the relation between power and speed for a typical modern large post panamax container vessel.
    PDF, 596.00 KB
  • Oct 24, 2010

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    Propulsion Trends in LNG Carriers
    Natural gas is a “clean” fuel compared to diesel and heavy fuel oil and, together with an increasing environmental responsibility, there is a rising demand for natural gas worldwide. Where it is not possible to transport natural gas by means of pipelines, the LNG (Liquid Natural Gas) carriers have to take over the transportation because natural gas in liquid form at atmospheric pressure only takes up 1/600 of the natural gas volume.
    PDF, 617.94 KB
  • Oct 02, 2007

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    Propulsion Trends in Tankers
    The purpose of this paper – dealing with tanker sizes above 5,000 dwt, and based on an analysis of tankers built/ordered over the last eight years – is to illustrate the latest ship particulars used for modern tankers, and to determine their impact on the propulsion power demand and main engine choice, using the latest MAN B&W two-stroke engine programme as the basis.
    PDF, 883.53 KB
  • Nov 13, 2007

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    LNG Carriers with ME-GI Engine and High Pressure Gas Supply System
    This paper describes the innovative design and installation features of the fuel gas supply system for an LNG carrier, comprising multistage low temperature boiloff fuel gas compressor with driver and auxiliary systems, highpressure piping system and safety features, controls and instrumentation. The paper also extensively describes the operational control system required to provide full engine availability over the entire transport cycle. Written in coorporation with Burchard Compression
    PDF, 1.43 MB
  • Mar 16, 2006

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    Shaft Generators for MC and ME engines
    The purpose of this paper is to provide detailed information about the various aspects related to the application of shaft generators on the MAN B&W MC and ME series of engines. In this paper the individual types of shaft generators are defined and their physical configuration is described together with the interface with the diesel engine.
    PDF, 756.36 KB

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